Who is Jane Doe No. 6? - KPTV - FOX 12

Who is Jane Doe No. 6?

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Everett Banyard found the body of Jane Doe No. 6 more than 25 years ago. Everett Banyard found the body of Jane Doe No. 6 more than 25 years ago.
Authorities found the bodies of six women, all victims of Dayton Leroy Rogers, later dubbed the Molalla Forest Killer Authorities found the bodies of six women, all victims of Dayton Leroy Rogers, later dubbed the Molalla Forest Killer
MOLALLA, OR (KPTV) -

On a recent hike through a secluded part of the Molalla Forest, bow hunter Everett Banyard remembered an August afternoon more than 25 years ago.

"It's changed so much," Banyard said.

Banyard recalled he had gone out hunting not far from his home. He said late-afternoon sunlight filtered through an overhead canopy of foliage and, as he glanced down, he saw some unusual matted fern. He then made a gruesome discovery.

"Right over there, is where I found the two bodies," he said, as he walked through the woods.

Banyard had found the nude bodies of two young women, one on top of the other.

"That's when I took my foot and pushed it back and seen what looked like a bare butt and then I seen a leg and I just backed off and got out of the area," he said.

Until now, Banyard had never spoken publicly about that August day and the days that followed, when police and criminalists combed the forest. They would find the bodies of four more women - six in all - victims of Dayton Leroy Rogers, later dubbed the Molalla Forest Killer.

At Rogers' murder trial in the late 1980s, prosecutors exposed his double life. He was a quiet repairman with a family who also tortured and murdered prostitutes. In 1989, a jury convicted Rogers of killing seven women, one outside an Oak Grove restaurant, along with the six women whose remains were found in the forest.

Using dental records, all but one of the discarded bodies was identified.

Identifying Jane Doe No. 6 has become a personal mission for forensic anthropologist Dr. Nici Vance.

"Jane Doe No. 6 is a huge mystery for us," Vance said.

Digging through archive evidence at the Oregon State Police crime lab late last year, Vance found some of Jane Doe No. 6's scalp and hair.

"We decided, well it's a biological material and we've got a chance to do DNA on it. So let's go ahead and get it done," she said. "We had a perfect storm. A good resource in the fact that it was packaged correctly. Investigators in 1987 were very diligent in the way they maintained the evidence. It was stable, basically."

Stable enough for analysts at the University of North Texas to create a mitochondrial or maternal DNA profile. For the first time, investigators now have a genetic picture of the mystery woman.

The DNA profile, along with sketches of what Jane Doe No. 6 may have looked like based on her recovered skull and dental records, have now been uploaded onto a national database called NamUs. The website is a repository of missing persons and unidentified remains. The woman's genetic profile, which indicated she may have been Asian, has also been added to other law enforcement DNA databases.

"You might think that if someone on the fringe of society isn't reported missing, that no one is looking for her, but I beg to differ," she said. "I am committed to getting a name to this face and these remains."

Back in the Molalla forest, Rogers' dumpsite has become a popular hiking trail.

"Right here is the Hardy Creek Trailhead and that's the spot," Banyard said.

Banyard still lives just up the hill from where he found the bodies. It still crosses his mind what went on in these woods, what torture those six women may have suffered.

"We had noticed the dog barking," he remembered.

And he hopes the sordid story may finally end, when Jane Doe No. 6 has a name, not just a number.

LINK: NamUs - National database for missing and unidentified persons

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