Oregon will track marijuana from seed to sale using RFID tags - KPTV - FOX 12

Oregon will track marijuana from seed to sale using RFID tags

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Oregon marijuana growers and processors will be required to start using the tracking system once the OLCC begins issuing licenses. Oregon marijuana growers and processors will be required to start using the tracking system once the OLCC begins issuing licenses.
METRC, which stands for Marijuana Enforcement Tracking Reporting Compliance, will operate Oregon’s CTS and also runs Colorado’s system. METRC, which stands for Marijuana Enforcement Tracking Reporting Compliance, will operate Oregon’s CTS and also runs Colorado’s system.
PORTLAND, OR (KPTV) -

When Colorado health officials found potentially unsafe levels of pesticide residue on marijuana and pot products cultivated by a grower last week, they issued an immediate recall.

Just like recalls of cheese and meat, the state told stores and consumers to look for packages with unique batch numbers.

That’s because Colorado tracks each marijuana plant from seed to sale using an electronic system utilizing computer software, bar codes and radio frequency identification tags.

A similar cannabis tracking system, or CTS, will be rolling out in Oregon later this month or in early April.

Marijuana growers and processors will be required to start using the program once the OLCC begins issuing licenses.

Retail shops will be required to start using the system later this year.

METRC, which stands for Marijuana Enforcement Tracking Reporting Compliance, will operate Oregon’s CTS and also runs Colorado’s system.

Pot is first tagged as a seedling or clone and assigned an individual number.

Once it is harvested, each package is tagged.

If the marijuana is processed into oils or edibles, boxes of those products are also tagged before they are shipped to stores.

Each plant is tracked through software using its individual number.

The program will help state inspectors insure state regulations are being followed.

“The licensees are required to report to the state what their inventory levels, what their packages are, what their sales are, what their testing results are,” said Scott Denholm, the executive director of the METRC program. “They’re supposed to associate all that stuff back to the product, so when the inspector goes in, he can say yes, everything is in compliance, you reported your sales accurately.”

The technology will allow inspectors to quickly check inventory with a handheld scanner that reads RFID from a distance.

“It also increases the speed and accuracy, so one person can do in 40 minutes what four or five people can do in five to six hours,” he said.

The system is also designed to protect consumers, by making it easy to find items in case of a marijuana recall.

Shango, a grower and medical marijuana dispensary chain in the Portland area, has been tracking their products for the last year using a point-of-sale software system called Biotrack.

It will interface with METRC software, once Oregon’s CTS begins.

Julie Dubocq, a controller at Shango, said they’re already pleased with the tracking system.

“It’s a great way to track our inventory and track statistics,” she said. “What are our yields like, what do we want to continue growing because the customers like it, the patients like it and it yields well.”

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