Oregon City students help Magic Wheelchair costumes come to life - KPTV - FOX 12

Oregon City students help Magic Wheelchair costumes come to life

Posted: Updated:
OCSLA students meeting with Magic Wheelchair founder Ryan Weimer. (KPTV) OCSLA students meeting with Magic Wheelchair founder Ryan Weimer. (KPTV)
OCSLA students working on two Magic Wheelchair costumes. (KPTV) OCSLA students working on two Magic Wheelchair costumes. (KPTV)
KEIZER, OR (KPTV) -

As Halloween approaches, an Oregon nonprofit called Magic Wheelchair is putting the finishing touches on costumes that are changing lives for children facing life-threatening illnesses.

For the last two years, volunteers have spent hundreds of hours making custom costumes that fit around existing wheelchairs, allowing a child’s disability to disappear.

In 2016, 25 costumes were made for children in 11 states, including a Cinderella carriage for Bella, a fire engine for Dalton and a chef’s kitchen for Anthony.

But the work is never over.

On Friday, students from the Oregon City Service Learning Academy got a first-hand look at how the costumes come together.

They went to the build shop in Keizer to help finish a Spider-Cycle from Spiderman and an AT-AT from Star Wars.

“I think it’s very cool, like, that makes me really happy,” OCSLA sophomore Anna Olson said, of the costumes going to medically fragile kids. “How much time and work they put into this, too, is really amazing.”

“They’re working on the details, which is really what makes a piece pop,” said Magic Wheelchair founder Ryan Weimer.

But the reason Magic Wheelchair does what it does came into jarring focus this week, when Weimer got a crushing call.

“A kiddo we built a TIE fighter for had passed away,” Weimer said, in tears.

Four-year-old Bryce only got to spend a few weeks with his costume.

He got it in September at the Rose City Comic Con, and his mother told Weimer the last two months of his life were the best two months of his life.

“He loved that thing, his mom told me that he talked about it every day,” Weimer said.

He loved it so much, he wanted to share it.

Bryce knew he was sick and told his mother to make sure it went to another child when he was gone.

“That’s the very essence of why we do what we do at magic wheelchair,” Weimer said.

It’s a labor of love, bringing a little joy – a little magic – where it’s needed the most.

To volunteer, donate or learn more about the nonprofit, visit www.magicwheelchair.org.

Copyright 2016 KPTV-KPDX Broadcasting Corporation. All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly
FOX 12
Powered by WorldNow CNN
All content © 2017, KPTV-KPDX Broadcasting Corporation, Portland, OR . All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.