Pair of orphaned Oregon bear cubs taken to Washington rehab cent - KPTV - FOX 12

Pair of orphaned Oregon bear cubs taken to Washington rehab center

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Female black bear cub abandoned by its mother near Myrtle Creek (Photo: Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife) Female black bear cub abandoned by its mother near Myrtle Creek (Photo: Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife)
CORVALLIS, OR (KPTV) -

A pair of orphaned Oregon bear cubs are now under the care of a rehabilitation center in Washington.

One of the cubs, a female, was brought to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife office in Corvallis on Thursday after its den near Myrtle Creek was disturbed by a brush-clearing operation.

The mother bear was believed to have abandoned the cub due to the disturbance and it was determined the mother was unlikely to return.

ODFW received a male cub this week, as well, after a hiker picked the animal up along the Santiam River Trail on Sunday.

Corey Hancock told FOX 12 the baby black bear appeared to be lifeless along the side of the trail. Hancock said he waited several minutes to see if the mother bear would return or if the cub would get up and walk away.

When neither of those happened, he picked up the bear and pleaded for help on Facebook about what to do next. He took the cub to the Turtle Animal Center in Salem and it was eventually transferred to an ODFW wildlife veterinarian and treated for mild pneumonia.

Both cubs are between 3 and 4 months old, according to ODFW. The male cub weighed 4.5 pounds and the female was 6 pounds.

Both bear cubs were taken to PAWS Wildlife Center in Lynwood, Washington on Friday. PAWS is a rehabilitation facility that specializes in care designed to allow young bears to develop without habituating to humans so they can be returned to Oregon and released back into the wild.

The plan is to release the bears between March and June 2018 when they will be 100 to 150 pounds.

Hancock was given a warning by Oregon State Police, as people have been cited in the past for similar circumstances.

Before picking up any wild animal, people are asked to contact ODFW, Oregon State Police or a wildlife rehabilitator for advice.

"ODFW and Oregon State Police remind Oregonians that taking young animals out of the wild isn't just against the law, it's also bad for the animal. These animals miss the chance to learn important survival skills from their mother like where to feed, what to eat, how to behave and avoid danger and predators," according to an ODFW statement.

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