Ore. woman not angry after dad misidentified as suspect in ‘Gold - KPTV - FOX 12

Ore. woman not angry after dad misidentified as suspect in ‘Golden State Killer’ case

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Deputies from the Sacramento County Sheriff's crime scene investigation office, conference about boxes of evidence gathered from the home of murder suspect Joseph DeAngelo (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli). Deputies from the Sacramento County Sheriff's crime scene investigation office, conference about boxes of evidence gathered from the home of murder suspect Joseph DeAngelo (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli).
CLACKAMAS COUNTY, OR (KPTV) -

The daughter of a Clackamas County man misidentified as a possible suspect in the Golden State Killer case says she holds no grudges against law enforcement.

Late last month, police arrested 72-year-old Joseph DeAngelo, a man police believe is responsible for a dozen killings and 50 rapes in California from 1976 to 1986.

Before DeAngelo was arrested, Clackamas County investigators thought an elderly Oregon man in Clackamas County might have committed the crimes.

Court records obtained by the Associated Press said investigators used a genetic profile based off DNA from crime scenes linked to the serial killer and compared it to information from genealogical websites, creating a family tree and using public records to identify the 73-year-old Oregon man.

According to the court records, the Oregon man was ordered to provide a DNA sample in 2017.

At the time, the man’s daughter says she had no idea what was happening. Regardless, she has no problems with how the case was handled.

 “I think if you want to break the law, then you need to know that there’s a big possibility you’re going to get caught,” the woman, who declined to be identified, said.

She says she worked with the Federal Bureau of Investigation for several months to provide additional information and isn’t angry that her father was initially misidentified.

“Even if one of our relatives did that, they should be caught, and they should be brought to justice,” she said. “They should pay for that crime if it had been a family member.”

The woman says she understands why people using DNA sites to trace their family roots might have privacy concerns, but believes that in this case, the ends justified the means.

“At least for me, if my DNA will lead to somebody who has done some harm to another human being, then go ahead … have my DNA!” she said.

She hopes her father, who is now in hospice care, is pleased his family could help.

“If this DNA maybe stops some people from thinking about doing those kinds of things, or maybe takes them off the streets so maybe they don’t harm more people, I think that is an amazing thing,” the woman said.

FOX 12 reached out to the American Civil Liberties Union shortly after the Associated Press report about the misidentified Oregon man was released.

The national organization says it is a complex privacy case they plan to study further. 

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