measles

KPTV photo.

PORTLAND, OR (KPTV) - Health officials Wednesday afternoon confirmed additional cases of measles in Oregon and Washington, bringing the total number of confirmed cases in Oregon up to four and the total number of confirmed cases in Clark County up to 50, with another 11 suspected.

Oregon Health Authority said it's three new cases were confirmed in people who were in close contact with a Multnomah County resident who tested positive for measles on Jan. 25.

Clark County Public Health confirmed one additional case, up from 49 earlier this week, and identified several new possible exposure sites:

  • The Vancouver Clinic Salmon Creek, 2525 NE 139th St. Suite 110, Vancouver from 8 to 11:45 am Wednesday, Jan. 30
  • Sea Mar Medical Clinic Salmon Creek, 14508 NE 20th Ave., Vancouver from 8:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 1 and from 11:30 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 4.
  • Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center Emergency Department, 2211 NE 139th St., Vancouver from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2

The first Multnomah County resident who tested positive for measles on Jan. 25 was in contact with someone from Clark County who was contagious with measles, according to OHA.

The individuals have remained at home and in regular contact with the Multnomah County Communicable Disease Services team, which checks on people who are sick with the viral infection.

Officials say they pose no risk to the public.

Clark County Public Health Wednesday afternoon said all lab results of confirmed cases have matched a wild strain of virus, preventable through vaccination, circulating in Eastern Europe.

One other case of measles has been confirmed in King County, Washington.

"This outbreak has put people at real risk," Ann Thomas, public health physician at the Oregon Health Authority, said. "It has also raised an awareness that measles could easily make a comeback, and the only way to prevent that is to get as many people vaccinated as possible."

The symptoms of measles start with a fever, cough, runny nose and red eyes, followed by a rash that usually begins on the face and spreads to the rest of the body, OHA says.

"This outbreak has put people at real risk," Ann Thomas, public health physician at the Oregon Health Authority, said. "It has also raised an awareness that measles could easily make a comeback, and the only way to prevent that is to get as many people vaccinated as possible."

For a list of possible exposure sites in Oregon, visit the Oregon Health Authority measles webpage.

Health officials urge anyone who believes they have been exposed at an identified location and believes they have symptoms to call their healthcare provider before visiting their office.

Copyright 2019 KPTV-KPDX Broadcasting Corporation. All rights reserved.

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.