Seattle almost reached its yearly amount of snowfall in one day

Another round of snow hit Washington state this week, leaving officials scrambling to get people off the streets and the governor declaring a state of emergency.

(CNN) -- Seattle got almost the same amount of snow it gets in a year in one day, leaving officials scrambling to get people off the streets and the governor declaring a state of emergency.

Another round of snow hit Washington state this week, leaving officials scrambling to get people off the streets and the governor declaring a state of emergency.

Nearly 20 million people in the Northwest are under storm alerts Saturday morning as one to two more inches of snow are expected to fall in Seattle, according to CNN meteorologist Haley Brink.

Seattle-Tacoma International Airport had 6.4 inches of snow Friday, according to the National Weather Service. It's the second most snow recorded in the area in a day for the past 20 years -- and more is still to come.

It's only the fourth time the area has seen six inches of snow since 1991. Seattle averages 6.8 inches of snow over the course of an entire year.

Washington takes precautions

More snowfall is expected Saturday, and officials are prepared. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee declared a state of emergency Friday as the region braces for whiteout conditions, whipping winds and frigid air.

"Everyone in our state needs to focus on preparing for the snow and staying safe," Inslee said in a statement. "Weather forecasters predict this may be a storm unlike one we've seen in many years. I encourage everyone to stay off the roads if possible and plan ahead if you must travel."

The Seattle Police Department tweeted that additional resources have been dedicated to getting the homeless community to warm shelters.

CNN storm tracker

With the declaration of a state of emergency, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is limiting the number of hours commercial vehicle drivers can be on the road. Only drivers collecting or delivering bulk milk products or de-icing road salt from FMCSA locations are exempt, the governor said.

Those stuck at home are taking a lighter tone to the city's reaction and the residents' preparedness.

Mike Jacobs tweeted that since supermarkets were out of kale thanks to "tiny fluffy balls of icy death," he was going to stay home and guard his supply.

Freezing temperatures and powerful winds

The winds expected to accompany the storm could cause issues with blowing snow, as well as downed power lines and trees. The wind gusts could reach anywhere from 20-30 mph in the Seattle area, while the northern Puget Sound and Olympics region could see gusts of 60 mph.

Temperatures are expected to remain below freezing until Monday afternoon, Brink said, with the forecast high expected to hit 35 degrees.

Seattle's average high at this time is 49 degrees, Brink said.

Those temperatures, combined with the wind, could make it feel like it's in the teens Saturday across the Seattle region.

If that wasn't enough, there's a possibility of more snow for Seattle Sunday into Monday.

Earlier this week, another storm shut down Seattle and left some neighborhoods with about half a foot of snow.

CNN's Chris Boyette contributed to this report.

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